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Construction

Construction

Few areas of the law give rise to the potential for conflict and litigation as does construction law. In 2006, Wisconsin became the 28th state to adopt a variation of a "right to cure" law. This means that homeowners who are dissatisfied with construction defects arising during the course of building, remodeling, and repair must provide the contractor with written notice of the alleged defect, and afford the contractor a reasonable opportunity to cure. This process is a prerequisite to filing suit under the Wisconsin Right to Cure Act. Navigating this complex system of deadlines, filing requirements, and procedures requires the knowledge and experience of a trained legal professional. John M. Kelly, Attorney at Law, LLC has over 42 years of experience in nearly every facet of construction law in Wisconsin.

Construction Lien Law

In nearly every construction situation, persons or entities supplying labor and/or raw materials to make improvements to a property are eligible to claim a lien against that property. Construction lien law is governed by Chapter 779 of the Wisconsin Statutes. To make a lien claim, a contractor, subcontractor, or materials supplier must file a claim with the circuit court within 6 months of the last time the claimant performed work or furnished materials. At least thirty days prior to filing the lien claim, the claimant must notify the property owner and any subcontractors, if applicable, in writing of its intent to file the claim. If you are a commercial or residential contractor, subcontractor, or materials provider seeking the imposition of a construction lien, you should consult with an experienced attorney to ensure you have met all of the statutory requirements. John M. Kelly, Attorney at Law, LLC is home to over 42 years of experience dealing with the establishment, execution, and enforcement of construction liens.